Tip #5: What are some useful tips on commenting on a student’s paper?

Do’s and Don’ts for Writing Commentary[1]by Adria Bader

Commentary DO’s:

  • Read a draft all the way through BEFORE you begin to comment on it
  • Spend at least 20 to 40 minutes commenting on a single draft
  • Use a number/comment system instead of LONG marginal comments
  • Raise questions from a reader’s point of view; note points that may not have occurred to the writer
  • Focus on the overall problems of content before looking at surface level errors (i.e. grammar, spelling)
  • Phrase comments clearly and carefully (The average Joe should be able to read the commentary and understand what needs to be changed.)
  • Make comments text-specific, referring specifically to that writer’s draft (NO “rubber stamps” such as “awkward” or “unclear” or “vague”
  • Direct comments to breaks in logic, disruptions in meaning, and/or missing information
  • Structure comments to help writers to clarify their purposes and reasons in writing that specific draft
  • Offer SUGGESTIONS, not commands, when possible
  • Comment through the use of questions (“This sentence confuses me a little; can you reword it to make it more clear? OR “Could you make a stronger transition between these two points?”)
  • Look for unexplained “Code Words” in the draft and ask the writer about them (“What exactly does `Different aspects’ mean here?”)
  • End comments should include the main STRENGTHS in a writer’s draft as well as 2 or 3 of the most important things that need improvement
  • If something appears too complicated to write in the commentary, just mention that you have something that you would like to talk to the writer about when you have your conference.
  • If the writer is not sure that they have understood the assignment, and you aren’t sure either, don’t be afraid to tell the writer to talk with his or her professor

 

Commentary DON’Ts:

  • Don’t write commentary in red ink
  • Don’t turn the writer’s paper into YOUR paper
  • Don’t contradict yourself (“Condense this sentence,” followed by, “You need to be more specific and develop this paragraph.”)
  • Don’t overwhelm a writer with too much commentary
  • Don’t take forever in your commenting on a draft: remember, the writer needs ample time to revise.

 

For another perspective, here’s a link to a related (brief) article entitled “The Rhetoric of Paper-Marking, Or A Wheelbarrow for Sisyphus” by Ray Smith, Director, Campus Writing Program at Indiana University, Bloomington: http://citl.indiana.edu/services/writing/wheelbarrow.php

It appeared in the Teaching Resources Center Newsletter; Vol. 9, No. 1, Fall 1997

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